Sustainable land-use investment and management

Unsustainable land-use management in tropical forest countries can fuel conflict over competing land uses, and contributes to deforestation and forest degradation — which, in turn, increase carbon emissions.

Sustainable land-use investment and management

Unsustainable land-use management in tropical forest countries can fuel conflict over competing land uses, and contributes to deforestation and forest degradation — which, in turn, increase carbon emissions.

Unreliable data and limited government experience with land-use planning processes, a lack of coordination among sectors and stakeholders, and a lack of understanding of financial flows and incentives towards various land uses are all contributing factors.

Addressing these challenges is essential to implementing private-sector zero-deforestation commitments, and to operationalising land-use related activities in Nationally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement on climate change.

The EU REDD Facility has developed tools and approaches to support inclusive land-use planning, analyse and map financial flows, and track progress towards sustainability in various REDD+ countries. In this way, we support sustainable land-use investment and management in such countries, and generate lessons and experiences at national and subnational levels.

Actions

Advancing jurisdictional sustainability in Vietnam, focusing on the Central Highlands region

The EU REDD Facility and the Mekong Development Research Institute (MDRI) support developing a jurisdictional sustainability framework and an associated monitoring system in Vietnam to promote sustainable land use and coffee production in the Central Highlands. The EU REDD Facility and MDRI are testing tools and approaches on monitoring, land-use planning and finance that support subnational decision making on sustainability.
Launch of the PLADDT process in Mintom municipalityRainbow EC

Facilitating municipal land-use planning in Cameroon

The EU REDD Facility engages with the Ministry of Economy, Planning and Regional Development (MINEPAT), IDH and WWF in the development of at least two Local Land Use Management and Sustainable Development Plan (PLADDT) at the municipal level.

Facilitating subnational land-use planning in the Republic of the Congo

The Congolese state's spatial planning strategy is still very centralised and is organised around ministries which have some difficulty in coordinating their reciprocal interventions. In addition, there is a certain disparity in planning tools, the scope of application and linkages of which have not yet been clarified. There is therefore a need to bring together and decompartmentalise approaches in order to promote coordinated regional planning.